Thursday, August 24, 2006

Latest films from Argentina, Bangladesh, Brazil, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba/Spain, India, Peru, Philippines and Sri Lanka

http://creativecontent.unesco.org/news/item?item_id=25238
UNESCO Article About "Aninag" (English Version)

KODAK: Kodak Supports Filipino Program with Thesis Award, Career Talk Series

http://www.kodak.com/US/en/motion/students/onCampus/july2003/filipinoAward.shtml

My Myspace space

http://www.myspace.com/riannehillsoriano
My lame myspace account.

Rianne's Friendster Blog

http://riannehill.blogs.friendster.com/my_blog/
My "default" personal blog. My rants and raves on anything and everything.

Friends, friends, friends




Babypix




RX booth and parties




friends pics




UP samaskom




Philip's Grad




Cell pix




Barkada




party life




Friends, friends, friends




Rianne&Philip




Yahoo! Photo Album




Rianne personale




cell pics




Babypix




Colleagues and Various Activities




vigan pix




AAS video




27th Gawad Urian




Cell pix




High School




New York Intl Independent Film Fest 2005




My family




filstar




Hallmark for L.I.F.E. Artists' Contract Signing




My Experience as a Hallmark for L. I. F. E. Artist






This is my first blog entry here. And it's nice to start off with something really worthwhile.  The contract signing of Hallmark for L. I. F. E. artists for 2006 last Aug. 16, 2006 was a really great experience...


I never thought that contributing my artwork for this endeavor could really make me this fulfilled as an artist. It makes me inspired really, especially the artwork I contributed includes two of my main characters from my short film "Aninag."


May Hallmark for L. I. F. E.'s mission and vision be realized in every year that it gives life to the leukemic children who benefit from this wonderful project.


This is the article about the project from Hallmark's website:


http://www.filstar.com.ph/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6&Itemid=2


 


Hallmark for L.I.F.E.


It is a sad reality that more and more children are being diagnosed with leukemia.  It is a depressing reality that the parents of most of these children cannot afford the medication to cure cancer.  It is a tragedy if we do not  do anything about it.
There is hope when there is life.


For eleven  years now, Filstar Distributors Corporation, licensee of Hallmark Cards in the Philippines, and the Leukemic Indigents Fund Endowment (L.I.F.E.), a charitable organization headed by the late Dr. Alendry Caviles, have been working hand-in-hand to lighten the burden of Filipino families experiencing the double tribulation of disease & poverty and to raise awareness on the alarming rate of young leukemic indigents in the country through the project, Hallmark for l.i.f.e.


This Christmas, be that hope to l.i.f.e.



Take part in this worthy endeavor by sending Hallmark for l.i.f.e. Christmas cards this yuletide season.  Strengthen your business and personal relationships, while ensuring a brighter future for indigent leukemic children.


Hallmark for l.i.f.e. 2006 Collection presents a whole new range of designs from Hallmark Holiday Classics and noted Filipino artists namely:  Jovito Andres, Remy Boquiren, Rolan Lalantacon, Dr. Dan Lerma, Norberto "Ambhet" Lugto, Jes Pelino, Nani Reyes, Vincent Reyes, Rianne Soriano, Platon Varquez and Mamert Ynigo.


Support l.i.f.e. and bring the future back to them.


There are five ways to order:


a) Send an electronic mail to fdc@filstar.com.ph This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it or dmdelmonte@filstar.com.ph This email address is being protected from spam bots, you need Javascript enabled to view it


b) Fax your order  to 671-1738


c) Call 671-0555 or 671-3171 and look for Daruel del Monte or Lyn Gaurano


d) Call or text your order to 0917-8824578


e) Mail your order to Filstar Distributors Corporation, 2/F Reliance Center 99. E. Rodriguez Jr Avenue, Bo. Ugong, Pasig City 1604, Philippines.


Our earnest gratitude and may all the joy, peace and blessing of the season be yours.
 

A Wonderful Experience with Hallmark for L. I. F. E.

The contract signing of Hallmark for L. I. F. E. artists for 2006 last Aug. 16, 2006 was a great experience.


Contract Signing for Hallmark for L. I. F. E.
I never thought that contributing my artwork for this endeavor could really make me this fulfilled as an artist. It makes me inspired really, especially the artwork I contributed includes two of my main characters from my short film "Aninag."
L. I. F. E. Artists for 2006
May Hallmark for L. I. F. E.'s mission and vision be realized in every year that it gives life to the leukemic children who benefit from this wonderful project.
Rianne, Rolan and Mamert with the L. I. F. E. kids

Saturday, August 12, 2006

Organizing my Blogs! www.riannehillsoriano.com/blog, http://riannehill.blogs.friendster.com/my_blog/ and www.riannehillsoriano.blogspot.com

From this day on, i shall be posting my film reviews at www.riannehillsoriano.com/blog. I transferred all my reviews there. My friendster blog is the more personal one while this blogger account shall be dealing with all sorts and kinds of film info, trivias, news, etc. (yielding more on the likes of - my favorite filmmakers, artists, films, film equipment, film and video cameras, SLRs, editing equipment, breakthroughs and similar stuff).

I didnt remove my film reviews here but the recent ones i made can now be accessed through www.riannehillsoriano.com/blog.

Thanks for dropping by!!!

Rianne

Organizing my Blogs! www.riannehillsoriano.com/blog, http://riannehill.blogs.friendster.com/my_blog/ and www.riannehillsoriano.blogspot.com

From this day on, i shall be posting my film reviews at www.riannehillsoriano.com/blog. I transferred all my reviews there. My friendster blog is the more personal one while this blogger account shall be dealing with all sorts and kinds of film info, trivias, news, etc. (yielding more on the likes of - my favorite filmmakers, artists, films, film equipment, film and video cameras, SLRs, editing equipment, breakthroughs and similar stuff).

I didnt remove my film reviews here but the recent ones i made can now be accessed through www.riannehillsoriano.com/blog.

Thanks for dropping by!!!

Rianne

Wednesday, August 02, 2006

Film Review: Saan Nagtatago Si Happiness

The pursuit for 'Happiness'
By: Rianne Hill Soriano

Saan Nagtatago Si Happiness
Directed by: Florida Bautista and Real Florido


Cinemalaya’s ‘Saan Nagtatago Si Happiness?’ by Florida Bautista and Real Florido is a semi-musical comedy film that revolves around the life of Tikyo (Andy Bais), a middle-aged ice cream vendor searching for his long-lost mother. Marked by its yellow tones and handheld shots, the film tackles the conflict between finding his mom (Caridad Sanchez) and courting the girl of his dreams (Darling Laviña) and how he attempts to become successful in winning these two women of his life. Tikyo believes that true happiness will come to him if he’ll be successful in winning the two women. He must find his way to happiness in as much as the other characters who are struggling for it as well.

At the age of 50, finding dreams and happiness isn’t part of Tikyo’s everyday life anymore. More than offering a helping hand to other people in need, Tikyo lives day by day with the simplest things in life as selling sorbetes, his only source of living. Given the kind of life he has somehow accepted, everything seems just fine for him. But things start to change when he gets the news that his mother is still alive. His life takes a different turn from then on. He does everything to find the woman of his life from enduring long lines in TV studios to raiding radio stations to seeking the help of a lunatic and even hysterical fortune teller. Then, his world spins into confusion when the charming girl of his dreams, Sara, comes into the picture. He becomes torn between finding his mother and pursuing the young woman’s heart. With the help of his good friend Nene (Mica Roi Torre), a child suffering from scarcity both in material and emotional aspects at her very young age, the two become more serious confidantes ready to help each other during their best and worst times and everything else that come in between.

The warm tones of the film tend to become overboard at times – especially because there are minor inconsistencies in the color grading. There are some underexposed and washed out shots, too. Some of the scenes with low-key lighting do not look fluid to the film’s entirety. The editing is very poor. The whole film becomes too straining to the eyes because the cuts are not seamless. Moreover, the cuts are generally abrupt and it lacks a certain kind of mastery of the language with the way the scenes are presented. Even the significant scenes needing enough establishing of emotions become wasted primarily because of the wrong cuts. More often than not, the parts with dialogues are mainly what are shown on screen without enough care on giving some breathing space to emancipate the right emotions from silence and from the characters’ supposed emotional take-off. The visuals lack proper timing to establish or sustain a mood and it generally yields to being verbose. Moreover, a number of shots tend to break the 180 degree rule in an audio-visual production – making the audience either confused with the shots or lose touch of the supposed fluidity of the cuts. Overall, the visuals become the major weakness of the film as it seems more of a rough cut because of the rawness of the editing. Furthermore, like the usual weakness Pinoy films tend to have, the sound of this film has minor problems too. There are some uneven sound elements and certain shots have no ambient sound. A number of discontinuities are very apparent as well – including the shot of Nene holding the bars of a gate and reaching something to the ground – the discontinuity is very obvious.

All the said weaknesses won't make the film sink into oblivion. Giving due consideration to the fact that the filmmakers are first timers, it somehow shows how important it is to make careful judgments and ask for consultations in order to effectively film a promising vision and story. At this point of time, a major re-editing can really help much in order for the film to gain its redemption.

With the aura of the film overall, the production team seem to have real fun during the shoot. It reflects the kind of 'personality' the film projects. And this happy mood radiated helps to somehow pull off some heart for the audience amidst its technical weaknesses.

The story is promising. On a personal note, a revamp should be made in order to achieve technical quality. The performances are generally good. Lou Veloso, Nanette Inventor and Rez Cortez render such funny scenes. However, a deeper characterization of the supporting characters may also help uplift the story. The songs meant for the film are complementing. However, there is something vague with its stand as a semi-musical. Though there are some entertaining dance numbers, something is lacking on this part.

Media Revolution’s 'Saan Nagtatago si Happiness?' is a promising story. I just hope that the makers of the film would look into the brighter side of the spectrum and take objective results from what they have read on this article for the betterment of the film. The filmmakers may consider to re-editing, or if possible, they may deem it necessary to reshoot some scenes or add some shots that would help the film. And in doing so, the 'pursuit for happiness' can really push itself to the surface.

Film Review: Tulad ng Dati

Tulad ng Dati: Inspired by music and memories
By: Rianne Hill Soriano

Cinemalaya’s ‘Tulad ng Dati’ by Michael Sandejas revolves around a fictional character inspired by the iconic life of The Dawn frontman Jett Pangan, who, after an assault, wakes up without a memory of his life after 1988. He merely remembers that he is a 20-year old rock idol who is enjoying the peak of his band’s career as it has been way back 1988. Wishing to change things back the way they were before, he embarks on an emotional yet hilarious quest against time.

Sandejas takes advantage of various cinematic possibilities in favor of a fictional narrative based on the band’s life and music. Crafted with the influential rock group’s fan base on the side, the story creation becomes a promising offer for the Pinoy audience looking for something beyond the formulaic mainstream offer and more especially to The Dawn fans who can relate to the film the most.

The film is a fictionalized bio-drama that pays tribute to The Dawn in an unusual and yet appealing way. The passion from the people behind the film is very much apparent with its outcome. The tribute promotes sincerity as its core can really be felt without unpretentious elements. It tries to validate how The Dawn has risen to become the pioneer rock group during the second half of the ‘80s and the details that followed after that.

Amidst the surging New Wave music during that time, Teddy Diaz, JB Leonor, Caloy Balcells and Jett Pangan cracked out from the fad by introducing their music and hitting it big with their impressive talents and rock tunes. At the height of their popularity, their leader, Teddy Diaz was murdered. The remaining members decided to continue with the music but eventually disband in 1996. In 2003, The Dawn reunited. And now, with their contribution to Filipino music, indeed, these legendary rock pioneers radiate a beguiling account worthy to be archived in film as well.

The film revolves around 2006 when Jett loses his passion for music and entertains thoughts of retiring from the band. And the film takes its title from a hit song by the band. The lead actors for the film are no less than The Dawn themselves: Jett Pangan, JB Leonor, Francis Reyes, Carlos Balcells and Buddy Zabala (formerly from the Eraserheads). Compelled to undergo acting workshops, the rockers render effective performances playing themselves. Ping Medina plays the role of the late Teddy Diaz. Agot Isidro plays the character of Beth, Jett’s wife. Also joining the roster are Karl Roy of POT, Mylene Dizon and a few more commendable talents from the film and theater circuits.

The film tends to lose touch on some of the eras it’s supposed to project as Agot Isidro’s make-up and hairdo not really changing in a span of around 5-10 years. Overall, the film's comedy works but the one who acted for the VJ role tends to push the film into something less than mediocrity. The acting and execution of the scenes on TV especially with the fictional music channel featuring the ineffectively slow-speaking VJ looks too fake and annoying. If ever the said kind of performance is really intended for reasons like to exude a certain type of satirical act or anything similar to that, it doesn’t really work at all.

The execution and overall treatment of the film promote the celebrated music of the band. The music video approach tends to uplift The Dawn’s morale, thus gaining for them another form of cult following through this moving picture’s refreshing move to highlight their iconic life. The video footages of the band, particularly the last part of the film paying tribute to the exceptional talent of Diaz playing the guitar similar to a violin further boosts the drive for the band’s music especially to those who don’t belong to the peak era when the band has performed. However, there are certain missing points that can make the film better in order to capture the hearts of those who don't know anything about the band. Somehow, for the film to be completely effective, the audience is required to have at least a little background about The Dawn. And this becomes a weakness for the film especially if it goes abroad for exhibitions and festivals. Good thing that this weakness is a little bit supported by the establishment of the band's performances, particularly the implementation of the music video scenes, to somehow justify their fame and greatness.

The internal struggle of Jett Pangan’s character becomes effective as how the script could have probably deemed it to be. The path he takes while finding his place in his strange new world proves itself to be a tough, emotional and sometimes hilarious journey accompanied by the vast expanse of the band’s music experience. The fiction works to promote the universal theme concerning denial and forgetting instead of acceptance. A story about acceptance and moving on, this film becomes a story imparting a good message and aesthetics.

If you love bands and you're a follower/fan of the Dawn, you'll get a sort of bonus in watching this film.

Aiming to be more than just a vehicle for The Dawn’s music, Sandejas crafts a truly compelling fictional story that becomes a breath of fresh air from the crop of recycled dramas, comedies, horror, fantasy and action flicks that have been flooding the local film market.

Film Review: Saan Nagtatago Si Happiness

The pursuit for 'Happiness'
By: Rianne Hill Soriano

Saan Nagtatago Si Happiness
Directed by: Florida Bautista and Real Florido


Cinemalaya’s ‘Saan Nagtatago Si Happiness?’ by Florida Bautista and Real Florido is a semi-musical comedy film that revolves around the life of Tikyo (Andy Bais), a middle-aged ice cream vendor searching for his long-lost mother. Marked by its yellow tones and handheld shots, the film tackles the conflict between finding his mom (Caridad Sanchez) and courting the girl of his dreams (Darling Laviña) and how he attempts to become successful in winning these two women of his life. Tikyo believes that true happiness will come to him if he’ll be successful in winning the two women. He must find his way to happiness in as much as the other characters who are struggling for it as well.

At the age of 50, finding dreams and happiness isn’t part of Tikyo’s everyday life anymore. More than offering a helping hand to other people in need, Tikyo lives day by day with the simplest things in life as selling sorbetes, his only source of living. Given the kind of life he has somehow accepted, everything seems just fine for him. But things start to change when he gets the news that his mother is still alive. His life takes a different turn from then on. He does everything to find the woman of his life from enduring long lines in TV studios to raiding radio stations to seeking the help of a lunatic and even hysterical fortune teller. Then, his world spins into confusion when the charming girl of his dreams, Sara, comes into the picture. He becomes torn between finding his mother and pursuing the young woman’s heart. With the help of his good friend Nene (Mica Roi Torre), a child suffering from scarcity both in material and emotional aspects at her very young age, the two become more serious confidantes ready to help each other during their best and worst times and everything else that come in between.

The warm tones of the film tend to become overboard at times – especially because there are minor inconsistencies in the color grading. There are some underexposed and washed out shots, too. Some of the scenes with low-key lighting do not look fluid to the film’s entirety. The editing is very poor. The whole film becomes too straining to the eyes because the cuts are not seamless. Moreover, the cuts are generally abrupt and it lacks a certain kind of mastery of the language with the way the scenes are presented. Even the significant scenes needing enough establishing of emotions become wasted primarily because of the wrong cuts. More often than not, the parts with dialogues are mainly what are shown on screen without enough care on giving some breathing space to emancipate the right emotions from silence and from the characters’ supposed emotional take-off. The visuals lack proper timing to establish or sustain a mood and it generally yields to being verbose. Moreover, a number of shots tend to break the 180 degree rule in an audio-visual production – making the audience either confused with the shots or lose touch of the supposed fluidity of the cuts. Overall, the visuals become the major weakness of the film as it seems more of a rough cut because of the rawness of the editing. Furthermore, like the usual weakness Pinoy films tend to have, the sound of this film has minor problems too. There are some uneven sound elements and certain shots have no ambient sound. A number of discontinuities are very apparent as well – including the shot of Nene holding the bars of a gate and reaching something to the ground – the discontinuity is very obvious.

All the said weaknesses won't make the film sink into oblivion. Giving due consideration to the fact that the filmmakers are first timers, it somehow shows how important it is to make careful judgments and ask for consultations in order to effectively film a promising vision and story. At this point of time, a major re-editing can really help much in order for the film to gain its redemption.

With the aura of the film overall, the production team seem to have real fun during the shoot. It reflects the kind of 'personality' the film projects. And this happy mood radiated helps to somehow pull off some heart for the audience amidst its technical weaknesses.

The story is promising. On a personal note, a revamp should be made in order to achieve technical quality. The performances are generally good. Lou Veloso, Nanette Inventor and Rez Cortez render such funny scenes. However, a deeper characterization of the supporting characters may also help uplift the story. The songs meant for the film are complementing. However, there is something vague with its stand as a semi-musical. Though there are some entertaining dance numbers, something is lacking on this part.

Media Revolution’s 'Saan Nagtatago si Happiness?' is a promising story. I just hope that the makers of the film would look into the brighter side of the spectrum and take objective results from what they have read on this article for the betterment of the film. The filmmakers may consider to re-editing, or if possible, they may deem it necessary to reshoot some scenes or add some shots that would help the film. And in doing so, the 'pursuit for happiness' can really push itself to the surface.

Film Review: Tulad ng Dati

Tulad ng Dati: Inspired by music and memories
By: Rianne Hill Soriano

Cinemalaya’s ‘Tulad ng Dati’ by Michael Sandejas revolves around a fictional character inspired by the iconic life of The Dawn frontman Jett Pangan, who, after an assault, wakes up without a memory of his life after 1988. He merely remembers that he is a 20-year old rock idol who is enjoying the peak of his band’s career as it has been way back 1988. Wishing to change things back the way they were before, he embarks on an emotional yet hilarious quest against time.

Sandejas takes advantage of various cinematic possibilities in favor of a fictional narrative based on the band’s life and music. Crafted with the influential rock group’s fan base on the side, the story creation becomes a promising offer for the Pinoy audience looking for something beyond the formulaic mainstream offer and more especially to The Dawn fans who can relate to the film the most.

The film is a fictionalized bio-drama that pays tribute to The Dawn in an unusual and yet appealing way. The passion from the people behind the film is very much apparent with its outcome. The tribute promotes sincerity as its core can really be felt without unpretentious elements. It tries to validate how The Dawn has risen to become the pioneer rock group during the second half of the ‘80s and the details that followed after that.

Amidst the surging New Wave music during that time, Teddy Diaz, JB Leonor, Caloy Balcells and Jett Pangan cracked out from the fad by introducing their music and hitting it big with their impressive talents and rock tunes. At the height of their popularity, their leader, Teddy Diaz was murdered. The remaining members decided to continue with the music but eventually disband in 1996. In 2003, The Dawn reunited. And now, with their contribution to Filipino music, indeed, these legendary rock pioneers radiate a beguiling account worthy to be archived in film as well.

The film revolves around 2006 when Jett loses his passion for music and entertains thoughts of retiring from the band. And the film takes its title from a hit song by the band. The lead actors for the film are no less than The Dawn themselves: Jett Pangan, JB Leonor, Francis Reyes, Carlos Balcells and Buddy Zabala (formerly from the Eraserheads). Compelled to undergo acting workshops, the rockers render effective performances playing themselves. Ping Medina plays the role of the late Teddy Diaz. Agot Isidro plays the character of Beth, Jett’s wife. Also joining the roster are Karl Roy of POT, Mylene Dizon and a few more commendable talents from the film and theater circuits.

The film tends to lose touch on some of the eras it’s supposed to project as Agot Isidro’s make-up and hairdo not really changing in a span of around 5-10 years. Overall, the film's comedy works but the one who acted for the VJ role tends to push the film into something less than mediocrity. The acting and execution of the scenes on TV especially with the fictional music channel featuring the ineffectively slow-speaking VJ looks too fake and annoying. If ever the said kind of performance is really intended for reasons like to exude a certain type of satirical act or anything similar to that, it doesn’t really work at all.

The execution and overall treatment of the film promote the celebrated music of the band. The music video approach tends to uplift The Dawn’s morale, thus gaining for them another form of cult following through this moving picture’s refreshing move to highlight their iconic life. The video footages of the band, particularly the last part of the film paying tribute to the exceptional talent of Diaz playing the guitar similar to a violin further boosts the drive for the band’s music especially to those who don’t belong to the peak era when the band has performed. However, there are certain missing points that can make the film better in order to capture the hearts of those who don't know anything about the band. Somehow, for the film to be completely effective, the audience is required to have at least a little background about The Dawn. And this becomes a weakness for the film especially if it goes abroad for exhibitions and festivals. Good thing that this weakness is a little bit supported by the establishment of the band's performances, particularly the implementation of the music video scenes, to somehow justify their fame and greatness.

The internal struggle of Jett Pangan’s character becomes effective as how the script could have probably deemed it to be. The path he takes while finding his place in his strange new world proves itself to be a tough, emotional and sometimes hilarious journey accompanied by the vast expanse of the band’s music experience. The fiction works to promote the universal theme concerning denial and forgetting instead of acceptance. A story about acceptance and moving on, this film becomes a story imparting a good message and aesthetics.

If you love bands and you're a follower/fan of the Dawn, you'll get a sort of bonus in watching this film.

Aiming to be more than just a vehicle for The Dawn’s music, Sandejas crafts a truly compelling fictional story that becomes a breath of fresh air from the crop of recycled dramas, comedies, horror, fantasy and action flicks that have been flooding the local film market.